Quilts of Wood

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Copyright 2009 Quilts of Wood

Welcome to Quilts of Wood!
 
Whether you have an interest in quilts or woodworking or decorating for Christmas I hope you will find something here that pleases you.
       
I came to these little ornaments in a roundabout way....I have made Shaker oval boxes and carriers since the early 1990's  and had managed to accumulate a lot of lumber that was not suitable for bands.....mostly cherry, maple, and some walnut.   A friend at the Southern Highland Craft Show in Asheville suggested that I come up with something I could make that would complement the other items in my booth and hopefully generate a little extra income and use some of this good wood.   I noticed that some of the other woodworkers had cutting boards in their booths.  I began to look at cutting boards on the web, how they're made, what makes one better than another one, what woods are used, and how they're finished and cared for.  I decided to make end grain boards because they're supposed to be easier on your knives.  Also, wonderful patterns can be created with the various woods and grains.  After experimenting with geometric patterns I decided that quilt patterns were much more appealing and settled on the Rail Fence design for the first one......then a Trip Around the World and a Log Cabin for the 2007 SHCG Fall show in Asheville.
The Southern Highland Craft Guild chooses a Christmas ornament ornament each year from one of their members to sell as a fundraiser for the guild.  I always purchased several of them  for gifts and enjoyed seeing what the new one would be each year.  Also many artists in the various mediums had an ornament at the Fall show....I had a miniature Shaker carrier that I made a few of each year.  So the idea came easily to shrink the cutting board to a size and weight that could be an ornament.....But could it be done?  Years ago I had been interested in making guitars and one of the fascinating processes I read about was making rosettes for sound holes.   Tiny strips of wood of different colors are assembled to produce a pattern visible on the end of a 'log' which is then cut into thin pieces.....like slicing a loaf of bread.  These pieces are then arranged in repeating patterns in a circle to produce the rosette.  The same process is used by polymer clay artists and button makers.  After deciding on a standard size (2-1/4" square) and thickness (no more that 1/4")  I chose my first pattern....once again the Rail Fence.  It was available at the 2007 Fall SHCG show and I was encouraged by the response to look at other patterns.  With help and suggestions from my quilter friends 5 more patterns were added for the 2008 season : Trip Around the World, Log Cabin, Bear's Paw, Pine Tree and Tulips in a Vase.  In 2009 the Goose in the Pond,  Churn Dash, Friendship Star, Ohio Star and Tumbling Blocks were added.  2010 will hopefully see the Bethlehem Star (almost finished), the Carolina Lily and the Morning Star.
 
                                 I can't sew a lick but I guess I'm a quilter now and wood is my fabric!
 
Photo by Robert Batey
Photo by Robert Batey
Photo by Robert Batey
Photo by Robert Batey
Photo by Robert Batey